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  • Friday, October 19, 2018 02:02 PM
    Diabetes can result in vision problems, so it is important to closely monitor patients through comprehensive eye examinations. Unfortunately, diabetic eye disease may cause vision loss and blindness. Diabetic eye disease is a group of conditions that includes cataracts, diabetic macular edema, diabetic retinopathy, and glaucoma.1 DIABETIC EYE DISEASE Controlling blood glucose by exercising, maintaining a healthy diet, and taking medication can delay or prevent vision loss. Early detection, treatment, and close monitoring are essential to prevent vision problems in patients with diabetes (Table). Diabetic retinopathy is the leading cause of vision loss, blindness, and vision impairment among patients with ...
  • Tuesday, September 18, 2018 11:38 AM
    Glaucoma and Reading Ability - Newswise (press release)
    MEDIA CONTACT Available for logged-in reporters only Newswise — Glaucoma is usually described as a disease affecting peripheral vision. So, it wouldn’t have any effect on reading, the ultimate task of central vision, right?Glaucoma is usually described as a disease affecting peripheral vision. So, it wouldn’t have any effect on reading, the ultimate task of central vision, right?In fact, glaucoma does affect reading. Why? First, while glaucoma does affect peripheral vision, it also affects central vision. Glaucoma patients with moderate or severe disease often describe looking through a fog which extends into their central vision. Because of this fogging, people ...
  • Tuesday, August 28, 2018 05:34 AM
    Among patients with systemic hypertension, researchers assessed the association between blood pressure (BP), ocular perfusion pressure (OPP) and occurrence of primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG). A close relationship between OPP and confirmed glaucoma in hypertensive patients was suggested in the findings, this association provided a further evidence of the vascular mechanism in glaucoma pathogenesis. Findings suggested an association of high values of diastolic BP (>90 mmHg) and low values of OPP ( Read the full article on Clinical Ophthalmology[1] References^ Clinical Ophthalmology (www.dovepress.com)
  • Wednesday, August 08, 2018 10:42 AM
    8 Possible Reasons Your Contacts Feel So Scratchy - SELF
    In a perfect world, your contacts[1] would seamlessly meld onto your eyeballs without ever causing you discomfort. In reality, sometimes it can feel like your contacts, in a mission to aggravate your eyeballs, are wearing the tiniest, scratchiest wool sweaters of all time.Here are some of the biggest issues that could be behind your scratchy lenses, along with how to fix them.1. You have dry eye.Dry eye[2] happens when your eyes can’t adequately lubricate themselves because the amount or quality of your tears isn’t up to par, according to the National Eye Institute[3] (NEI).This can cause a bunch of symptoms[4] ...
  • Monday, July 30, 2018 03:12 PM
    Advances and Combinations Raise Sights on Uveal Melanoma - Curetoday.com
    Clinical trials seek to discover new ways to attack the disease, limit metastasis and prevent recurrence.JESSE WALDINGER'S tumor was found during an eye exam. Fortunately, it was discovered early and his vision was saved. - PHOTO BY AMBER BAUHOFFJesse Waldinger had been putting off his annual eye exams because his vision wasn’t changing. He just didn’t think it was necessary to see an optometrist. When his vision started declining in 2017, he booked an eye exam, where he was stunned to learn he had a tumor in his right eye. The diagnosis was uveal melanoma.Waldinger underwent plaque brachytherapy — a ...
  • Tuesday, July 24, 2018 08:50 AM
    Turmeric eye drops could treat glaucoma - Medical Xpress
    Turmeric. Source: Pixabay[1] A derivative of turmeric could be used in eye drops to treat the early stages of glaucoma, finds a new study led by UCL and Imperial College London researchers. In the new Scientific Reports paper, the researchers report a new method to deliver curcumin, extracted from the yellow spice turmeric, directly to the back of the eye using eye drops[2], overcoming the challenge of curcumin's poor solubility.The research team found the eye drops can reduce the loss of retinal cells in rats, which is known to be an early sign of glaucoma.They are also investigating how the ...
  • Tuesday, July 17, 2018 06:50 AM
    Insights into new corneal surgery - Medical Xpress
    Credit: CC0 Public Domain An innovative vision-restoring procedure performed in Australia for less than 10 years has been reported on in detail for the first time. It will assist surgeons to make important decisions when using corneal grafts to treat thousands of Australians facing blindness each year.The findings form part of the 2018 report of Flinders University the Australian Corneal Graft Registry (ACGR), which collects and analyses national data relating to corneal transplants.An international frontrunner, the registry was established at Flinders in 1985 and has collected data on more than 35,000 graft procedures and enabled many advances to be made ...
  • Tuesday, July 17, 2018 05:18 AM
    Why It's so Important to Get Your Eyes Checked - Bel Marra Health
    Going to see an ophthalmologist is an important part of maintaining your overall health. Many different areas of your health can be revealed through an eye exam. Sure, the main goal is to detect changes in vision, but your eye doctor is also able to uncover other possible health problems.Here are three other reasons why you should go for a regular eye exam.Taking Diabetes and Blood Pressure Medications Can Affect the EyesIf you’re over the age of 60, it’s recommended that you go for regular eye exams, not only because being of older age is a risk factor for vision ...
  • Monday, July 09, 2018 04:04 PM
    Dry eye is often overlooked, which can cause trouble
    By Judith Whitehead – Contributing WriterJuly is Dry Eye Awareness Month.When a person does not have the ability to produce enough of their own natural tears to adequately lubricate their eyes, they have a condition called dry eye. More than 40 million Americans suffer from dry eye, and many mistake their symptoms for allergies, fatigue or living in a dry environment.There are a few types of dry eye.One involves being deficient in aqueous, or fluid, production. In these cases, not enough tears are being produced by the body. This is the most common type.Eyes become itchy, red and uncomfortable. The ...
  • Sunday, July 08, 2018 04:35 PM
    Macular Degeneration: A Major Health Problem In The United States - citysuntimes
    – By Stephen Cohen, O.D.Most people have an awareness that glaucoma can lead to loss of vision, and that diabetes can damage the back of our eyes. However, there is a disease that is more prevalent than glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy combined. It is estimated that this disease will affect about 7 percent of the population above the age of 40, more than 10 percent aged 60 or more, and about one in three people aged 75 or older! This disease? Macular Degeneration (ARMD).Deposits in the sensitive part of our retina responsible for our sharp, central vision, will gradually damage ...
  • Monday, July 02, 2018 03:40 AM
    Alarmingly High Pollution Levels to Drive Dry Eye Disease ...
    Dry eye disorder (DES) is otherwise called keratisis sicca and keratoconjunctivitis sicca. Patients experiencing DES indicate harm to the visual surface, shakiness in the tear film, and visual unsettling influence. Tear film covers the visual surface, which is comprised of three interlaced layers, a shallow lipid layer, created by meibomian organs help with decreasing tear vanishing and uniform tear spreading, center thick watery layer delivered from lacrimal organs, and the deepest hydrophilic mucin layer created from cup cells of conjunctiva and epithelium of visual surface.The global dry eye disease diagnostics market[1] is driven by ascend in pervasiveness of dry eye ...
  • Sunday, June 17, 2018 08:00 PM
    Doctors offer differing views, and a patient tells her story.
  • Tuesday, June 12, 2018 10:57 AM
    Justin Puglisi undergoing Lasik eye surgery in Garden City, N.Y. The 15-minute procedure was performed 700,000 times last year.
  • Thursday, May 24, 2018 03:00 AM
    (HealthDay News) -- Black eyes are common among kids who play sports. Most cases can be treated with self-care at home.The American Academy of Ophthalmology suggests how to safely treat a black eye[1]:Use an ice pack for 20 minutes at a time, once every hour, to reduce swelling and ease pain[2].Use a bag of frozen vegetables or ice cubes wrapped in cloth if an ice pack is not available.Do not use raw meat on a black eye. The bacteria on raw meat raises the risk of infection. Avoid contact sports until the injury gets better.If swelling and pain[3] don't improve ...
  • Tuesday, May 15, 2018 03:00 AM
    FRIDAY, May 11, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- It's not just your skin that needs protection from ultraviolet rays, health experts warn.UV rays from the sun can cause corneal sunburn[1] (photokeratitis) and UV damage that has been linked to macular degeneration[2], cataracts[3], cancer[4] and pterygium (a growth on the white part of the eye), according to Prevent Blindness, a nonprofit eye health and safety group.The group has declared May as Ultraviolet (UV) Awareness Month.While everyone is at risk of sun-related eye problems[5], the threat is highest among people who: spend long hours in the sun; have certain retina disorders; have had ...
  • Tuesday, February 27, 2018 12:45 AM
    Dr. Rohan J. Shah, Southeastern Retina Associates Dr. Rohan J. Shah, Southeastern Retina Associates Photo by Contributed Photo /Times Free Press. Q: What causes a red eye? A: There are several causes of a "red eye." It is important to differentiate the more common, less urgent ones from serious medical ones that require more observation and treatment. Dry eye syndrome is the most common cause of a red eye, which is especially common during winter months due to the dry air and use of heaters. Appropriate use of lubricating drops can help control redness and burning in most cases. When ...
  • Monday, February 12, 2018 11:56 PM
    CHATTANOOGA, Tenn. (WDEF) – If you want to see a hero attend the annual Chattanooga Fire Department awards ceremony.You’ll find plenty there.CFD recognized several firefighters and civilians during the event Monday night including Chattanooga Fire Captain Steve Everett.He received CFD’s top award, the Medal of Heroism, for saving a woman’s life while off duty.“We’re trained to help. We come in, seen somebody that’s house was on fire. We wanted to make sure everyone was okay,” Capt. Everett said.On September 17th, Captain Everett came across a house fire and acted even though he wasn’t wearing firefighter gear.He said he called 911 and ...
  • Monday, January 08, 2018 06:50 PM
    Alice and Emma Eaker read a magazine at Access Family Pharmacy in Hixson. The nine-year-old twins got flu shots this year. (Image: WTVC){ }CHATTANOOGA, Tenn. — The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says there is widespread flu activity [1]in 46 states, including Tennessee, Alabama and Georgia. The Chattanooga area is part of the pattern. In this first week of 2018, CHI Memorial says it had 58 positive flu tests. Those numbers are up from this time last year. According to a CHI Memorial spokesperson, there were 84 positive flu cases in December 2017. In December 2016, there were just 16. "We're ...
  • Tuesday, January 02, 2018 06:40 PM
    Chattanooga State Community College has named two winners for the Outstanding Technical Student of the Year. Kevin Moton was named the OTSY by the College’s Tennessee College of Applied Technology Division, and Ianthe Bryant was named the Outstanding Technical Student of the Year for Chattanooga State. While TCAT has had an OTSY competition for several years, this year’s competition marks the inaugural competition for degree-seeking students at Chattanooga State. The announcement was made by the college President Dr. Rebecca Ashford and the Executive VP Dr. Jim Barrott. Mr. Moton and Ms. Bryant will both graduate in May 2018. Each year instructors select ...
  • Tuesday, December 19, 2017 12:45 AM
    Central High senior Betsy Harrigan is a recipient of a QuestBridge 2017 National College Match Scholarship. She was accepted into Vanderbilt University, where she will study psychology with a pre-med emphasis. / Photo provided by Hamilton County Schools. Central High senior Betsy Harrigan is a recipient... Photo by Contributed Photo /Times Free Press. Three local high school seniors have one less thing to worry about in the coming years - well, one less really big thing to worry about. The seniors recently were awarded full scholarships to prestigious universities through QuestBridge's 2017 National College Match Scholarship. Recipients Bethsahida Harrigan and ...
  • Wednesday, December 06, 2017 04:55 PM
    Caty Davis, Miss Tennessee 2017, will be visiting the children of Signal Centers, 109 N. Germantown Road on Friday at 9:45 a.m. Miss Tennessee is a yearly guest of the Chattanooga Civitan Club during their December fundraiser. The meeting is highlighted by an enthusiastic Clazton fruitcake auction, which raises money for local charities.“Each year Miss Tennessee takes tours of agencies near and dear to Civitans’ hearts,” said Pam Hudson, Signal Centers Children’s Program director and Civitan member. “This year she will stop by Signal Centers where she will certainly be inspired by our children’s tenacity, drive, individuality and charm.” Signal Centers Children’s ...
  • Saturday, November 18, 2017 02:00 AM
    By E.J. MundellHealthDay ReporterLatest Senior Health NewsTHURSDAY, Nov. 16, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Macular degeneration[1] is a major cause of vision loss[2] in older Americans. But new research shows that baby boomers are somehow avoiding the illness at higher rates than their parents did.Why the improvement? The researchers aren't sure, but say that lowered rates of heart disease[3] -- long tied to poorer eye health -- may be one reason. In any case, "aging[4] baby boomers [born between 1946 and 1964] may experience better retinal health at older ages than did previous generations," concluded a team led by Karen Cruickshanks, ...
  • Tuesday, November 14, 2017 08:56 PM
    M&M makes plastic pails, plastic containers and custom packaging for the chemical, pharmaceutical, health care and construction industries. (Image: WTVC)CHATTANOOGA, Tenn. — Officials say packaging manufacturer M&M Industries plans to create 110 jobs with a $42 million expansion of its operations in southeast Tennessee.Gov. Bill Haslam and Department of Economic and Community Development Commissioner Bob Rolfe said Tuesday that M&M will purchase and retrofit a building in Chattanooga and expand its current manufacturing facility in the city.M&M makes plastic pails, plastic containers and custom packaging for the chemical, pharmaceutical, health care and construction industries. Officials say the expansion will allow the ...
  • Tuesday, November 07, 2017 04:05 PM
    Big Brothers Big Sisters of Greater Chattanooga launches the Beyond School Walls Workplace Mentoring model program at EPB, which supports students who want to explore future career opportunities with local employers. “Launch Day at EPB was a huge success,” said Site-Based Mentoring Director Emily Barrow. “We applaud EPB management and employees for their commitment to making a difference for the children and ultimately the community. Programs like Beyond School Walls change lives at a time when even the smallest choices can alter the course of a youth’s future.” The Launch Day included 20 “Littles” meeting 20 “Bigs” at EPB, who will continue ...
  • Wednesday, November 01, 2017 12:52 AM
    "Food, in the end, in our own tradition, is something holy. It's not about nutrients and calories. It's about sharing. It's about honesty. It's about identity." That quote may be attributed to Dutch scientist and agriculture advocate Louise Fresco, but it's a sentiment I also heard expressed on my Eat Sip Walk food tour of Chattanooga's Southside. "We all eat, but we rarely eat the same food. I'm really interested in the concept of connecting people around food. It kind of breaks down these walls immediately when you share the same food," tour owner Ryn Tompkins said as we were ...
  • Saturday, October 14, 2017 03:00 AM
    By Steven ReinbergHealthDay ReporterTHURSDAY, Oct. 12, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A U.S. Food and Drug Administration advisory panel on Thursday recommended approval of a gene therapy that could grant the gift of sight to young people with a rare type of inherited[1] vision loss[2].The panel members' vote was unanimous. The FDA is not required to follow the advice of its panels, but it usually does.The treatment, which involves replacing a nonworking gene with a new one, is opening a new world for children and teens[3] with the inherited retinal disease called Leber congenital amaurosis."This is a gene therapy that can ...
  • Wednesday, September 20, 2017 03:00 AM
    MONDAY, Sept. 18, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Nerf guns can be great fun for kids -- until someone damages an eye, doctors warn.Nerf guns or "blasters" are hugely popular toys -- used by kids and adults alike -- that shoot a soft foam "dart" or "bullet."But a new report from emergency department doctors at one British hospital is raising concerns that the toy guns might not be as harmless as once thought.The report outlines three serious eye injuries from Nerf guns and "calls into consideration the need for protective eyewear[1] with their use," according to Drs. Mukhtar Bizrah and Seema ...
  • Tuesday, September 12, 2017 02:05 PM
    Friday, September 08, 2017 | 12:10pm Nashville – The State of Tennessee deployed multiple teams of health care and search and rescue professionals south today to help local, state, and federal officials in Florida dealing with the impact of Hurricane Irma, the second, catastrophic hurricane to strike the continental U.S. this season.“I am glad we could call upon Tennessee’s well-trained and dedicated emergency managers, first responders and health professionals to help Florida through what could be a devastating disaster,” said Director Patrick Sheehan of the Tennessee Emergency Management Agency.  “Effective emergency management is built on solid relationships, and our partnerships with ...
  • Wednesday, August 30, 2017 12:30 PM
    This week's episode of Inside Chattanooga Football includes highlights and commentary on the 27-13 loss to Jacksonville State, as well as a look ahead to next Saturday's match-up against SEC powerhouse, LSU. We also have a feature on one of the football team's camp learning sessions - the value of social media etiquette and ones online and social media presence.  As always, the Voice of the Mocs Jim Reynolds is our host and he is joined by head football coach Tom Arth[1].  Inside Chattanooga Football is a production of Learfield Sports, Mocs Sports Properties and MocsVision. References^ Tom Arth
  • Tuesday, August 22, 2017 05:39 PM
    So if you did not make a proper pinhole projector[1], use specially designed glasses that complied with international safety standards, or even don a welders’ helmet[2], you might be noticing some changes to your vision today.Symptoms to watch forThe extent of eye damage depends on how long someone stares at the sun — though even a few seconds could be destructive. If you glanced at the eclipse and then looked away, then back again, that could have caused problems because the effects are cumulative, said Dr. Jack Cioffi, the chairman of the Department of Ophthalmology at Columbia University.“Less than a ...
  • Tuesday, August 15, 2017 08:06 AM
    Eclipse safety classes will be available at The Public Library’s branches. (Photo: Ashley Day)Many brick-and-mortar chains remain sold out of safety glasses to use during the upcoming solar eclipse, but local stores and organizations are filling the need.Each branch of The Public Library will have 100 pairs to give away Aug. 18 from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.Because there’s a limited supply, there will only be one pair available per person. A library card isn’t needed to get a pair.NASA also has information about 2-D- and 3-D-printed projectors[1] that can be used to view the eclipse. While library officials won’t ...
  • Tuesday, August 08, 2017 10:04 AM
    As the total solar eclipse approaches, demand for safe viewing glasses has spiked and experts are warning the public to be wary of dangerous knockoffs.Glasses that are safe for directly viewing the sun must meet the International Organization for Standardization’s standard, and will indicate they are ISO 12312-2 compliant. But recently the American Astronomical Society issued a warning indicating such a label is no longer adequate to verify glasses’ safety, citing “alarming reports of potentially unsafe eclipse viewers flooding the market.”“It now appears that some companies are printing the ISO logo and certification label on fake eclipse glasses and handheld ...
  • Monday, July 31, 2017 10:00 AM
    Tears serve a variety of functions, which accounts for the kinds of complications their deficiency can cause. They lubricate the eye, supply it with nutrients and oxygen, and help to focus images and clear the eye of debris.Untreated, severe dry eye disease can result in scarring, ulceration, infection and even perforation of the cornea, the clear outer layer of the eye that protects the iris, pupil and anterior chamber and accounts for much of the eye’s optical power.But the current and evolving knowledge of the nature of tears and their production has led to a better understanding of the various ...
  • Saturday, June 24, 2017 03:00 AM
    By Julie DavisHealthDay ReporterFRIDAY, June 23, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- You might think of eye problems[1] like cataracts[2] as signs of old age, but one step you can take now will protect your vision for the future -- and you can do it with style. We're talking about sunglasses[3].Your eyes need to be protected from the dangers of UV light the same way your skin does. And just like your skin, it's protection you need every day, not just when you're at the beach.Eye doctors recommend wearing your shades anytime you're outside, although they are extra important in summer and ...
  • Thursday, May 18, 2017 05:47 PM
    BALTIMORE — Scientists and engineers are 3D printing[1] all types of objects these days, including eyes: A group of eye specialists and eye-care providers from the Netherlands has used 3D-printing technology to create artificial eye structures, called conformers, in a small study of five children.The technique could help children with conditions called microphthalmia and anophthalmia, in which they are born with underdeveloped or missing eyes, respectively, the research team says. These conditions, which can occur in one or both eyes, affect more than 10 percent of blind children worldwide and as many as 30 in 100,000 children, according to previous ...
  • Wednesday, May 10, 2017 03:45 PM
    In a medical first, surgeons have used a robot to operate inside the human eye , greatly improving the accuracy of a delicate surgery to remove fine membrane growth on the retina . Such growth distorts vision and, if left unchecked, can lead to blindness in the affected eye. Currently, doctors perform this common eye surgery without robots. But given the delicate nature of the retina and the narrowness of the opening in which to operate, even highly skilled surgeons can cut too deeply and cause small amounts of hemorrhaging and scarring, potentially leading to other forms of visual impairment, ...
  • Monday, May 08, 2017 11:00 PM
    Google's latest Doodle[1] marks the 181st birthday of France's most famous ophthalmologist, Ferdinand Monoyer.Monoyer is best remembered for introducing the diopter, a unit of measurement for vision still used today, as well as the eponymous Monoyer chart used to test subjects' clarity of vision. Each row in his eye chart represents a different diopter, from smallest to largest. The diopter measures the distance a person would have to be from the text to read it.Although his name might sound unfamiliar, there's a good chance you've read it before if you've taken an eye exam: Monoyer hid his own name within ...
  • Thursday, April 06, 2017 10:00 PM
    For generations, mothers have encouraged children to take long, slow breaths to fight anxiety. A long tradition of meditation likewise uses controlled breathing to induce tranquillity.Now scientists at Stanford University may have uncovered for the first time why taking deep breaths can be so calming. The research, on a tiny group of neurons deep within the brains of mice, also underscores just how intricate and pervasive the links are within our body between breathing, thinking, behaving and feeling.Breathing is one of the body’s most essential and elastic processes. Our breaths occur constantly and rhythmically, much like our hearts’ steady beating. ...
  • Monday, March 20, 2017 06:00 AM
    It’s hard to resist late-night cravings, but try to limit your bedtime nosh to 100 or 200 calories, 300 calories tops, said Isabel Maples, a spokeswoman for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, and choose nutrient-rich items that may be lacking in your diet, like fruits and vegetables, low-fat dairy foods, whole grains or nuts, “to really make those calories count.” (Seafood and beans are other good options, but not particularly appealing before bed.) Keep in mind that snacking contributes to weight gain, and studies have found that nearly one-quarter of the calories we eat come from snacks.
  • Friday, March 17, 2017 03:00 AM
    By Dennis ThompsonHealthDay ReporterWEDNESDAY, March 15, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Stem cells[1] may offer new hope for people losing their vision to age-related macular degeneration[2], but that promise can come with some peril, new research shows.In one report, three older women were permanently blinded at a Florida eye clinic that performed unproven stem cell treatments on their eyes in 2015, said senior study author Dr. Jeffrey Goldberg. He's chair of ophthalmology for the Byers Eye Institute at Stanford University in Palo Alto, Calif.The women all thought the stem cell therapy was part of a clinical trial, but there's no evidence ...
  • Monday, March 06, 2017 06:00 AM
    A balanced diet is an important foundation to maintain good health, but manyAmericans don’t know what nutrients are best for their eyes, and that diet can affect your eye health and vision as you age. Dr. Sean Claflin, Colorado Optometric Association President, encourages Americans to visit their doctor of optometry annually to discuss proper nutrition and to ensure their eyes are functioning properly.“It’s important for people to be proactive with their health—make good lifestyle choices now to help avoid problems later,” said Dr. Claflin. “Stick to the building blocks for overall well-being: enjoy a nutrient-rich diet, stay active, and avoid harmful habits, such as ...
  • Monday, February 20, 2017 10:00 AM
    Local advocates are hosting an event this week to raise money and awareness about the advantages of having a bikeable, walkable community"Biking and walking is ... a very healthy lifestyle," Bike Walk Chattanooga Vice Chair Chris Carr said. "There are economic interests around being connected to [places] and slowing down, shopping and spending money when you're walking and biking." The Bike Walk Chattanooga event is slated for Feb. 23 from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. at The Daily Ration, 1220 Dartmouth St. The organization's mission is "to enhance the quality, safety and accessibility of the Chattanooga area for walking, biking and transit by promoting community, civic engagement ...
  • Tuesday, February 14, 2017 09:00 AM
    Dr. James Weinstein, a back pain specialist and chief executive of Dartmouth-Hitchcock Health System, has some advice for most people with lower back pain: Take two aspirin and don’t call me in the morning.On Monday, the American College of Physicians published updated guidelines that say much the same. In making the new recommendations for the treatment of most people with lower back pain, the group is bucking what many doctors do and changing its previous guidelines, which called for medication as first-line therapy.Dr. Nitin Damle, president of the group’s board of regents and a practicing internist, said pills, even over-the-counter ...
  • Monday, February 06, 2017 10:00 AM
    Laundry detergent pods are increasingly contributing to eye injuries among preschoolers, indicates a U.S. study that also gives injury prevention recommendations.The pods are often brightly coloured pouches that resemble candy and contain enough laundry detergent for a single use.Previous injuries associated with the use of the products include poisoning, choking and burns.Candy-coloured detergent packs a hazard to kidsIn Canada, more than 100 cases have been reported in pediatric emergency departments between 2012 and 2015, according to the Canadian Paediatric Society.Now, U.S. researchers have analyzed reports of emergency department visits for eye injuries resulting in chemical burn or conjunctivitis (inflammation commonly known as ...
  • Monday, January 30, 2017 10:00 AM
    Insomnia is like a thief in the night, robbing millions — especially those older than 60 — of much-needed restorative sleep. As the king laments in Shakespeare’s “Henry IV, Part 2”: O sleep, O gentle sleep, Nature’s soft nurse, how have I frightened thee. That thou no more will weigh my eyelids down, And steep my senses in forgetfulness?The causes of insomnia are many, and they increase in number and severity as people age. Yet the problem is often overlooked during routine checkups, which not only diminishes the quality of an older person’s life but may also cause or aggravate ...
  • Monday, January 23, 2017 09:00 AM
    Being nearsighted is far more common than it once was. The prevalence of myopia, the condition’s medical name, in Americans has soared by 66 percent since the early 1970s, according to a 2009 study by the National Eye Institute; in China and other East Asian countries, as many as 90 percent of recent high school graduates are thought to be nearsighted.Myopia results when eyeballs are longer than normal, changing the angle at which light enters the eye and therefore the ability to focus on distant objects. The disorder involves a complex interplay of genetics and environment and usually begins before ...
  • Tuesday, January 17, 2017 09:00 AM
    It is officially winter in our household because I have pulled out the vitamin D supplements. My daughter was too young last winter to remember that she added a vitamin to her morning routine, but my boys knew what it signaled.Instead of gobbling down the vitamins without query as they did last winter, my boys fired questions my way as to why they had to take them. I guess this is what teenagers do: They question their parents about everything, even the things they have taken for granted for more than a decade.I’m okay with their questions. I certainly don’t ...
  • Monday, January 09, 2017 10:00 AM
    How safe is melatonin to take regularly for sleep problems? Are there more risks for children versus adults?There’s a dearth of safety data for melatonin, but there are a number of potential concerns, especially for children.“I think we just don’t know what the potential long-term effects are, particularly when you’re talking about young children,” said Dr. Judith Owens, director of the Center for Pediatric Sleep Disorders at Boston Children’s Hospital. “Parents really need to understand that there are potential risks.”The pineal gland in the brain ramps up production of the hormone melatonin in the evening, as light fades, to encourage ...
  • Wednesday, January 04, 2017 09:00 AM
    Pre-eclampsia — the pregnancy complication characterized by high blood pressure and potential organ damage — is linked to eye problems in the mother later in life, new research has found.Canadian researchers tracked more than a million women who delivered babies in Quebec between 1989 and 2013, of whom 64,350 were given a diagnosis of pre-eclampsia. Then they followed them using hospital discharge data over the years. The study is in Obstetrics and Gynecology.After adjusting for age, socioeconomic status, diabetes, hypertension, obesity and other factors that can affect the eyes, they found that compared with women who did not have pre-eclampsia ...
  • Thursday, December 29, 2016 09:00 AM
    When you think about maintaining a healthy work force, you probably think about providing health insurance for your employees, encouraging them to use sick days when necessary and maybe even starting a wellness program or an informal weight-loss challenge. There’s something else you can do to keep employees healthy that pays off for both you and your staff: setting up an ergonomic office.Ergonomics is the process of designing work tools to fit the needs of the humans using them. An office that’s ergonomically set up can reduce the chances of your employees suffering repetitive stress injuries, such as carpal tunnel ...
  • Tuesday, December 20, 2016 12:00 PM
    The new year is the perfect opportunity for reflection, renewal and the chance to start fresh. Consider making lifestyle changes that can improve your vision and health throughout the year.  Here are five ways that you can help keep your eyes and body healthy in 2017.1. Get an eye exam. An annual trip to the eye doctor is critical for the entire family to ensure healthy and sharp vision. But did you know your visit to the optometrist is important to your overall health too? A routine eye exam can potentially detect signs of chronic diseases like diabetes, high cholesterol, ...
  • Thursday, December 15, 2016 09:00 AM
    Our eyes are delicate yet important organs, and with age comes issues related to them.After age 65, be sure to have a complete eye exam with your ophthalmologist every year or two.That’s to check for age-related macular degeneration, diabetic degeneration, glaucoma or cataracts and other eye conditions, according to the American Academy of Opthamology. 
  • Wednesday, December 14, 2016 08:32 PM
    Some well-known Chattanooga landmarks are featured in the new historic photo book of the Paul Hiener Collection published by Chattanoogan.com.It is now available at Zarzour's Restaurant on the Southside. One picture of interest shows a "Dangerous Keep Out" sign at the Fireman's Fountain. For several years, alligators were kept in the pool at the small park across from the County Courthouse.The new book features a wide range of interesting old Chattanooga pictures ranging from the Civil War to local personalities.Mr. Hiener, a longtime Chattanooga printer and lifelong resident, collected over 3,000 historic pictures of his beloved hometown. He made some ...
  • Wednesday, December 07, 2016 10:48 AM
    Vote for the best towns Cast your ballot here. Outside magazine Best Town in America competition is broken down by region and has six voting rounds. East Annapolis, MD; Bar Harbor, ME; Brattleboro, VT; Cold Spring, NY; East Stoudsburg, PA; Elmira, NY; Lake Placid, NY; Lebanon, NH; Middlebury, VT; New Haven, CT; Northampton, MA; Pittsburgh, PA; Portsmouth, NH; Providence, RI; Red Bank, NJ; New York, NY South Alpine, TX; Athens, GA; Beaufort, SC; Bentonville, AR; Birmingham, AL; Boone, NC; Charlottesville, VA; Chattanooga, TN; Fayetteville, WV; Houston, TX; Ocala, FL; Oxford, MS; Raleigh-Durham, NC; Savannah, GA; Tampa, FL; Roanoke, VA Midwest ...
  • Tuesday, December 06, 2016 12:00 PM
    If you want to enjoy your holidays to the fullest, you have to feel your best. Take these simple steps to stay healthy this season.1. Wash your hands. Without a doubt, this is the best way to protect yourself and others from illness. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says the best way to get the job involves five steps — wet, lather, scrub, rinse, dry — and if done properly can reduce the spread of intestinal and respiratory illness. Carry hand sanitizer — one that is at least 60 percent alcohol — for times when hand washing isn't ...
  • Tuesday, December 06, 2016 09:39 AM
    Teens and young adults who spend more time outdoors may be less likely to become nearsighted later in life than those who spend less time outdoors, a new study suggests. People in the study who spent more time exposed to ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation — which the researchers calculated based on the participants' exposure to sunlight — between ages 14 and 39 were less likely to be nearsighted at 65 than those who spent less time exposed to UVB radiation, the researchers found. "Increased UVB exposure was associated with reduced myopia, particularly in adolescence and young adulthood," the researchers wrote ...
  • Monday, November 28, 2016 09:00 AM
    With the holidays around the corner, your to-do list might feel longer than Kris Kringle's. But if you're sacrificing your health — and your vision — due to an overpopulated calendar, it's time to give your eyes the best holiday gift ever: an annual exam. In fact, there are several reasons this task should be right at the top of your list, which you should be checking twice.It could save your lifeNeed one big motivator to get you to the eye doctor? That short exam could be a lifesaver — literally.“Eyes will tell a lot about what going on in ...
  • Wednesday, November 23, 2016 09:00 AM
    Your eyes are the window to your soul, so maybe that’s why they are so sensitive. Our peepers are prone to infection, injury, and numerous other perils. The good news is there are easy ways to protect them, from pupil to retina.THROW SHADESunglasses are both stylish and good for your eyes, as many of them block ultraviolet rays that could cause cataracts. With cataracts, the clear lens of the eye slowly becomes cloudy, impairing vision. The American Academy of Ophthalmology says “direct sunlight hastens their formation,” so wearing sunglasses is a key preventative measure. Sunglasses also protect the retina, the light-sensitive tissue at ...
  • Tuesday, November 15, 2016 09:00 AM
    The theme of this year's World Diabetes Day is “eyes on diabetes,” focusing on preventative eye care screening for diabetes patients. Diabetes is one of the leading causes of blindness in the developed world. Officials with West Georgia Eye Care say it is important to get annual health screenings as well as eye exams. "In the diabetic world, the trouble with diabetes is once it gets in the eyes and causes disease it can be really hard to treat, so we want to prevent diabetic eye disease so that we can all save our vision and continue to see well and use that ...
  • Tuesday, November 08, 2016 11:00 AM
    In the past decade, ophthalmologists have been prescribing nutritional supplements to be taken daily to prevent or slow vision loss from age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Now, using nutritional supplements for eye health has become more common. But does increasing the recommended dose increase your protection? A case report reveals what can happen when a patient takes more of a supplement than their body needs.
  • Monday, October 31, 2016 09:00 AM
    Just because you can see now doesn’t mean your sight will be safe for ever, warns an optometrist
  • Tuesday, October 25, 2016 12:00 PM
    Aging is a natural part of life and some health challenges can't be avoided.Like any other part of the body, your eyes are susceptible to age-related problems.Age-related risks include dry eye, glaucoma, macular degeneration, cataracts and diabetic retinopathy. But you can reduce your chances of vision loss and keep your eyes healthy by following some simple steps.Make sure to get a comprehensive eye exam in which your eyes are dilated. Dilation allows doctors to check for signs of damage or disease.Wear sunglasses or a hat with a brim and use protective eyewear when playing sports. Prolonged sun exposure is linked to ...
  • Monday, October 17, 2016 09:00 AM
    Contact lens-related keratitis is on the rise, according to a recent CDC report. Approximately 41 million US individuals wear contact lenses, and almost 99% of contact lens wearers surveyed reported at least one behavior that puts them at risk for an eye infection.   Keratitis (cornea inflammation) is a common eye infection that can be caused by viruses, bacteria, fungi, or parasites that enter the eyes as a result of poor contact lens hygiene.Contact lenses are classified as medical devices and regulated by the FDA. Between 2005 and 2015, there were a total of 1075 contact-lens related adverse events reported, of which:213 (19.8%) ...
  • Monday, October 10, 2016 11:00 AM
    Nearly 1 in 5 contact lens-related eye infections reported to a federal database involved a patient who experienced eye damage, according to a report published in CDC’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR).The infections, submitted to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) Medical Device Report Database, included patients who had a scarred cornea, needed a corneal transplant, or otherwise suffered a reduction in vision. These contact lens-related eye infections can lead to long-lasting eye damage but are often preventable.
  • Monday, October 03, 2016 09:00 AM
    There is evidence that nutrients can play an important role in treating and preventing age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the leading cause of vision loss in people over the age of 60 in the United States.Macular degeneration affects the tissue in the eye that is responsible for central vision, says Tammy Roberts, University of Missouri Extension nutrition and health education specialist.“Some studies have shown that people who eat dark, leafy green vegetables such as spinach, kale, broccoli and collard greens have a lower risk of AMD,” Roberts says. “There is lutein in these foods. Lutein is concentrated in the retina and ...
  • Monday, September 19, 2016 10:00 AM
    Did you know children should begin receiving thorough eye examinations by a licensed optometrist or ophthalmologist by the age of 3 to ensure their vision is developing properly? According to the American Optometric Association, one in four children has a vision-related condition. Amblyopia (lazy eye) and refractive error (nearsightedness, farsightedness and astigmatism) are too often left undiagnosed and untreated and can lead to long-term, irreversible vision issues. Children with uncorrected vision conditions may also face many barriers in life, including poor academic performance, fatigue and impaired eye-to-hand coordination. That’s why Sunshine Health, in coordination with Envolve Vision, is working to educate parents and ...
  • Tuesday, September 13, 2016 06:48 PM
    The Salvation Army will hold its Pathway of Hope fundraising luncheon Wednesday at the historic Chattanooga Choo-Choo in the Imperial Ballroom at 11:30 a.m.  Three hundred are expected to be in attendance including the new Salvation Army Area Commander, Major Robert Lyle who will deliver the keynote message.  The Brassworks, a brass ensemble from the Jericho Brass Band and soloist Deborah Gunn will provide music.As poverty increases in America, families are increasingly vulnerable. Approximately one in six Americans live in poverty today. The longer a child lives in poverty, the greater the chance she or he will remain in poverty ...
  • Tuesday, September 06, 2016 12:00 PM
    Investing in your eye health is potentially one of the most important investments you can make.From having regular eye checks and monitoring any degeneration through to supporting your eye health with a diet full of fresh whole foods – there are many different ways you can support these amazing organs.The eyes connect to the body in various ways. Certain vitamins and minerals can protect against and, in some cases, even help prevent numerous diseases such as cataracts, glaucoma, and age-related macular degeneration.
  • Friday, August 19, 2016 11:22 AM
    (Reuters Health) – Middle- and lower-income children don’t visit eye doctors as often as wealthier kids, and as a result, thousands of them may have undiagnosed sight-threatening conditions, U.S. researchers say.All of the nearly 900,000 children in the study were covered by a national health insurer, but still, there were disparities in their access to eye care, researchers report in Health Affairs.Experts advise that all children under age 5 be screened for two eye diseases, strabismus and amblyopia. In strabismus, the eyes are not aligned with each other, causing double vision. To get rid of the double vision, the brain ...
  • Friday, August 19, 2016 10:12 AM
    Many reported cases of serious eye damage result from misusing contact lenses, including sleeping in them or wearing them beyond their recommended use, a report released Thursday[1] by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) suggests. Between 2005 and 2015, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) received reports of 1,075 contact lens-related corneal infections that involved ulcers or keratitis, which is inflammation of the cornea, according to a CDC news release. About 20 percent of these reports involved serious eye damage, but about a quarter of those cases could have been avoided with proper contact lens use. "Although contact ...
  • Tuesday, June 28, 2016 12:41 PM
    PhotoTivoli Gardens amusement park in Copenhagen at night.Credit April O'HareOver the past three years I’ve been plagued by one of the common curses of aging: cataracts. During that time my vision gradually deteriorated, as the normally transparent natural lenses of my eyes became increasingly opaque, going from a gentle soft focus, to gauzy, then cloudy, and ultimately downright foggy. This was apparently the result of some unhappy combination of sun exposure, age, a number of potentially insidious environmental and dietary factors, and just plain genetic bad luck. (My mother and two of my brothers also suffered from this condition.)Every patient ...
  • Friday, June 24, 2016 03:00 AM
    By Dennis ThompsonHealthDay ReporterWEDNESDAY, June 22, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A short-lived optical sensation can lead some smartphone users to mistakenly believe they've lost sight in one eye, British doctors report.The temporary vision loss[1] can affect people who read their smartphone in the dark while lying on their side, explained Dr. Gordon Plant, an ophthalmologist with Moorfields Eye Hospital in London.When they stop reading and get up to do something else, they might suddenly lose vision in the eye they've been using to read their smartphone, said Plant, senior author of a paper on the phenomenon. Luckily, it's a temporary ...
  • Wednesday, June 22, 2016 12:54 PM
    CUMBERNAULD, Scotland (AP) - A survey from a Scottish eye care company could be sparking a color controversy similar to last year's debate over "The Dress." Optical Express says on its website that it conducted a survey in the United Kingdom asking whether a swatch of a teal-type color was blue or green. The company says 64 percent of more than 1,000 people who responded said it was green. Thirty-two percent thought it was blue. But when the same people were shown the same color between a pair of distinctly blue swatches, many changed their minds. Ninety percent said it ...
  • Friday, June 17, 2016 02:05 AM
    USA Today Network Sydney Neely, The (Memphis) Commercial Appeal 6:05 p.m. EDT June 17, 2016FedEx and Orbis employees stand in front of the Orbis Flying Eye Hospital after its official christening at the FedEx Express World Hub on Thursday.(Photo: Yalonda M. James/The (Memphis) Commercial Appeal)MEMPHIS — From the outside, the world's only airborne eye hospital resembles a normal aircraft. But, instead of first-class and coach seats, this plane has a 46-seat classroom[1] and 3-D film and broadcast capabilities.It's the Orbis Flying Eye Hospital, a teaching laboratory run by Orbis International, a nonprofit that fights blindness throughout the world.On Thursday, Orbis unveiled its ...